Center for Entrepreneurship Featured at PACK Coffee Connection

Posted on February 16th, 2018 by Allendale Columbia School

At this week’s PACK (Parents of Allendale Columbia Kids) Coffee Connection, Amy Oliveri, Director of the new AC Center for Entrepreneurship, discussed her vision for the Center. Though she was only hired for the position at the beginning of this school year, she’s making good progress in helping students not only learn about entrepreneurism but actually become entrepreneurs.

The vision for the new Center is for it to be “a hub for entrepreneurship that will create opportunities for our students/participants to make an impact on the world at an unprecedented level by learning to adapt to a constantly evolving world, connecting globally, and carving their own path. This authentic way of thinking and working develops a universally applicable and transferable mindset and skill set.”

One of the visible changes she’s brought forward is having students run the AC school store, the Wolf Den. Students manage inventory, do marketing, and work as clerks, having learned the Square point-of-sale system that they use in the store and in the new online store at wolfden.allendalecolumbia.org.

Another effort is engaging with the AC Center for Global Engagement on such things as the Senegal trip that has students partnering with an organization to solve real-world problems in Senegal, and with the AC Invent Center on things like TEDxAllendaleColumbiaSchool. There are also connections to local businesses, such as the Mindset to Skillset program where students pitch ideas to local entrepreneur judges.

Of course, there are many curricular impacts. Lower School offers Junior Achievement and Innovation Day. Middle School students can take such classes as Business and the Entrepreneurial Mind; Entrepreneurship: Makers and Problem Solving; Entrepreneurship, Social Innovation, and B Corps; and Modes of Persuasion. And Upper School has a huge range of opportunities, including courses in Behavioral Science, Social Innovation, and the Act of Solving Problems and Having Influence; Innovation and Design; Professional Writing; Financial Literacy: Personal and Business Finance; and Digital Design and Illustration.

If you missed the talk, you can take a look at the slides by clicking on the image, and contact Amy Oliveri with any questions, comments, or opportunities.

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Posted in: Centers for Impact, Entrepreneurship, Global Engagement, Highlights, Invent, Lower School, LS Birches, Middle School, MS Birches, The Birches, Upper School, US Birches

AC Student-run TEDx Brings Ideas, Learning

Posted on February 16th, 2018 by Allendale Columbia School

Learning occurred on multiple levels at TEDxAllendaleColumbiaSchool on February 3rd. You may already be familiar with TED talks, and TEDx events are local versions of those talks. What makes this TEDx event different from most is that it was planned and produced from start to finish by AC students.

TED events are all about sharing ideas, and, as one would expect, the sold-out audience gained a lot of insights from a stellar selection of presenters:

  • Sam Thomson, Student, Boston University, and CEO, Bluum
  • 17 School 17 Student Council
  • Alan Raskin, Student, Calkins Road Middle School
  • Anderson Allen, Assistant Educational Coordinator, Boys, and Girls Club of Rochester
  • Natalie Northrup, Student, Honeoye Falls-Lima High School
  • Andrew Brady, President & Chief Evolutionary Officer, The XLR8 Team, Inc. and Conscious Capitalism ROC
  • Emily Atieh, Senior, Allendale Columbia School
  • Brian Roets, Practice Lead: Infrastructure and End-User Computing, SMP Corp
  • Carmen Gumina, Superintendent, Webster School District

But the learning behind the scenes by students in the TEDx class and club that produced the event will probably have the biggest, longest impacts, according to faculty advisors Amy Oliveri and Tony Tepedino. We posed some questions to three of the students who led the effort, Rachel Sherin ’19, Marissa Frenett ’19, and Fiona Lutz ’20.

Q: What were some of your objectives for this year’s TEDx event? Did you meet those objectives?
Rachel:  For this year’s TEDx event, we wanted it more geared towards kids. In the past, more of the older community was present at the event. This year we had one speaker from Allendale and two other students from different schools present at the event. We also had a good turnout of student attendees and volunteers.
Marissa: One of our very most important objectives was to get many sponsors from local people. We tried to get all dinner items from local restaurants. With plenty of work, we successfully got a salad from Headwater Food Hub, pizza from Salvatore’s, and mac and cheese from Macarollin!

Q: TEDx is about ideas worth spreading. Does that stop with the event, or how do you plan to continue spreading the ideas presented going forward?
Fiona: Because our event brings in a lot of members from outside the Allendale community, the goal for our TEDx is to leave people thinking about new ideas they might not have considering before and to share them with their peers. Especially with this year’s theme about restarting, we hope that people can apply the topics presented to their everyday life. Not only do we hope that our event’s talks and topics will inspire others in the community, but these talks are also shared online as well which can then be seen by virtually anyone.

Q: How has your experience with TEDx impacted you, either with the ideas presented or in the production of the event?
Marissa: TEDx has impacted me a lot. I think specifically the last speaker was very inspiring. He helped me realize that finding a good combination between academics and happiness is very important and should be done. That talk sort of changed the way I approach things now.
Fiona: Before becoming a part of the TEDx class, I attended the event for several years prior, but this year when I joined the class and actually got to work hands on with something I was genuinely interested in, it was very rewarding. As a part of the class, I was able to be a speaker coach for Samuel Thompson, who spoke about striving for progress over perfection. Seeing Sam’s talk come together over the few months I worked with him and then actually being able to see his talk live on the TEDx stage was great because not only had we both worked so hard on preparing him for the event, but Sam’s talk was personally relatable to me, since even during the semester, I struggled on working towards my goals and often times wanted perfection so badly, but was disappointed when things didn’t work as planned. His talk gave me a different perspective.

Q: What one thing do you want to carry forward from the event?
Rachel: Everyone worked so hard together to put the event together. I would like to carry that passion and positive energy throughout life.
Marissa: I thought that teamwork played a huge role in the success of this event. We all had to find speakers, sponsors, and a bunch of other stuff. That is what made our event as great as it was. I want to carry that, being open to work with people I wouldn’t usually.

You can see more photos from TEDx on Twitter, Instagram, and Flickr.

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Posted in: Centers for Impact, Eleventh Grade, Entrepreneurship, Global Engagement, Highlights, Invent, Ninth Grade, Partnerships, Tenth Grade, The Birches, Twelfth Grade, Upper School, US Birches

1st Grade Social Entrepreneurs Learn While Helping

Posted on February 2nd, 2018 by Allendale Columbia School

Annie King and Linsay Alexander, 1st grade teachers

What happens when you combine children’s love for animals, fascination with buying and selling, and treats? Authentic, project-based learning – this week in the form of a social entrepreneurship venture making and selling dog biscuits to raise money for a local animal shelter.

Students sold dog biscuits they had made to learn to count change.

As we approached ways to make our math money unit a more practical, authentic learning opportunity, we revived an idea from Annie’s first year at AC. What is the most realistic way of obtaining and counting change? Selling a product!

If you’ve seen our classroom, with our resident rabbit, bearded dragon and array of bird feeders, it is evident that our children love animals. Several of our students have a passion for pet dogs, so we decided to make dog biscuits to sell. We spent our Monday morning in the Rainbow Room café baking biscuits (see recipe below). The baking process alone is rich in authentic learning, with students engaged in hands-on counting, simple fractions, units of measure, proportions, temperature, time, texture, shapes, material reuse, germs and cleanliness; in addition to digestion and allergy issues (since many dogs, like many people, do not tolerate wheat).

Once the baking was complete, students focused on marketing, which included making posters to advertise around AC and handouts to take home. This process involves writing, spelling, drawing, penmanship, spatial relations, and design. Sales teams interacted with customers on Tuesday and Wednesday morning from 8:00 to 8:20 a.m.: greeting guests, making eye contact, explaining the process and purpose of their project, practicing persuasion, answering questions, and expressing gratitude.

Out of the kindness and generosity of our students, when discussing where proceeds should be donated, they decided “To help poor animals who don’t have a family,” as one child stated. Students used their computers to research three local animal shelters, advancing their skills in internet searching, typing, reading, listening, and fact-finding. They each submitted a ballot, so, as one student explains, “If Lollypop Farm gets nine votes and the other shelters get seven votes, then we would give the money to Lollypop Farm, because it got the most votes.”

Students weighed the total change earned and made estimates based on their knowledge of coin values thus far in our money unit. Earlier in the week, we worked with a group of students proficient in counting mixed coins, coaching them on how to count large amounts of coins. They, in turn, taught their classmates how to count our sum of money received on Tuesday and Wednesday. When students are involved in helping to teach their peers, everyone wins.

In the end, we raised $181.87, and first graders decided to split the donations between Lollypop Farm, Verona Street Shelter, and Animal Service League. In turn, students developed a variety of foundational skills that will stick with them, as they utilized a variety of their senses to make learning more tangible. Throughout  the process, first graders didn’t just learn about baking and business; they experienced what it was to be a baker, marketer, salesperson, accountant, and social entrepreneur.

After totaling the change and voting on which shelters to donate to, we asked our first graders what they enjoyed most about this venture, with Callahan summing it up best: “Everything – I loved everything about this project!”

Recipe: Cleo’s Dog Biscuits

2 eggs
1/2 cup canned pumpkin
2 tablespoons dry milk
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
2 1/2 cups brown rice flour *
1 teaspoon dried parsley (optional)

Preheat oven to 350.

In large bowl, whisk together eggs and pumpkin to smooth. Stir in dry milk, sea salt, and dried parsley (if using, optional). Add brown rice flour gradually, combining with spatula or hands to form a stiff, dry dough. Turn out onto lightly floured surface (can use the brown rice flour) and if dough is still rough, briefly knead and press to combine.

Roll dough between 1/4 – 1/2″ – depending on your dog’s chew preferences, ask first – and use biscuit or other shape cutter to punch shapes, gathering and re-rolling scraps as you go. Place shapes on cookie sheet, no greasing or paper necessary. If desired, press fork pattern on biscuits before baking, a quick up-and-down movement with fork, lightly pressing down halfway through dough. Bake 20 minutes. Remove from oven and carefully turn biscuits over, then bake additional 20 minutes. Allow to cool completely on rack before feeding to dog.

Makes up to 75 small (1″) biscuits or 50 medium biscuits

* Brown rice flour gives the biscuits crunch and promotes better dog digestion. Many dogs have touchy stomachs or allergies, and do not, like many people we know, tolerate wheat.

 

Kristin Cocquyt

Ann King

After pursing her passion for teaching, Ann became a long-term substitute at Allendale Columbia before beginning to teach first grade full-time at AC. Prior to beginning her teaching career, Ann was in the financial industry as an Assistant Vice President, Financial Analyst, and Corporate Trainer at two different regional banks. Ann earned her Bachelor of Science Degree in Economics from Penn State College and her Bachelor of Science Degree in Elementary Education from Roberts Wesleyan College.
Kristin Cocquyt

Linsay Alexander

Linsay is an educator with a Master of Science for Teachers degree in Art Education from Rochester Institute of Technology and has nearly 10 years experience in the field. She has taught in both large classrooms and small studio settings and has successfully created arts curricula for students in both public and private schools. As a member of the Rainbow Room team, Linsay works with both Pre-Primary and Lower School students at AC. Linsay has also filled in admirably as a long-term sub in first grade this year.
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Posted in: Centers for Impact, Entrepreneurship, First Grade, Highlights, Lower School, LS Birches, The Birches

Allendale Columbia School Hosts Sixth TEDx Event

Posted on February 1st, 2018 by Allendale Columbia School

The TEDx stage is being prepared for Saturday’s event.

Allendale Columbia students present their sixth-annual TEDx event on Saturday, February 3rd, organized by youth for youth. The independently organized event, licensed by TED, is built around the theme of CTRL + ALT + DEL, leading to the question of “How and what do you reset, or reboot?”

This year’s event has nine speakers scheduled to take the stage, including:

  • Sam Thomson, Student, Boston University, and CEO, Bluum
  • 17 School 17 Student Council
  • Alan Raskin, Student, Calkins Road Middle School
  • Anderson Allen, Assistant Educational Coordinator, Boys and Girls Club of Rochester
  • Natalie Northrup, Student, Honeoye Falls-Lima High School
  • Andrew Brady, President & Chief Evolutionary Officer, The XLR8 Team, Inc. and Conscious Capitalism ROC
  • Emily Atieh, Senior, Allendale Columbia School
  • Brian Roets, Practice Lead: Infrastructure and End-User Computing, SMP Corp
  • Carmen Gumina, Superintendent, Webster School District

Organized by the TEDxAllendaleColumbiaSchool class and club, the event aims to create dialogue, as well as give people a forum to share their passions, ideas and experiences. This will be one of only three TEDx events scheduled in Rochester this year.

The class and club are advised by Amy Oliveri, Director of the AC Center for Entrepreneurship, and Tony Tepedino, AC Hybrid Learning Coordinator and Entrepreneurship teacher.

For more information on the event and to view the full speaker lineup, visit tedxallendalecolumbiaschool.org. Registration is closed for the event, but you can follow the event on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

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Posted in: Centers for Impact, Eleventh Grade, Entrepreneurship, Highlights, Invent, LS Birches, MS Birches, Ninth Grade, Tenth Grade, The Birches, Twelfth Grade, Upper School, US Birches

AC Teams Win Awards at VEX Robotics Qualifiers

Posted on February 1st, 2018 by Allendale Columbia School

Three of Allendale Columbia School’s 5th grade Robotics teams advanced to the Northern New York State Championship in the VEX-IQ Challenge Qualifier on Saturday, January 27th, in Buffalo. They also brought home several awards, for a total of eight awards for 5th grade teams over just the past three years.

Team 1250A, with Ethan, Lizzie, Jack, and Jerry, and Coach Truong and Coach Diehl, took home the Excellence Award, the highest award presented in the VEX IQ Program. The awardee exemplifies overall excellence, dedication, devotion, hard work, and teamwork. They also won the Teamwork Champion Award with their alliance partners from iCanCode for the highest score in the Teamwork Challenge Finals matches.

Coach Klinkbeil and Coach Cooper led Mollie, Oliver, Ariela, and Marina on Team 1250D to the Design Award, given to the team that produced a clear and complete Engineering Notebook that documents and demonstrates organization and effectiveness in the team’s robot design process.

The coveted Judges Award was awarded to Team 1250C, with Ella, Gwen, Victoria, and Maya, with Coach Herberger and Coach Timpani. The Judges Award is presented to a team deserving of special recognition for effort, perseverance, and accomplishments that may not fall under existing awards but are still deserving of recognition.

Team 1250B also enjoyed the competition, with Coach Reece and Eric, Carater, Priya, and Audriana.

The faculty advisor for the 5th grade VEX-IQ program, Lower School STEM teacher Donna Chaback, also won the Volunteer of the Year Award for the region.

The next time to see the AC teams compete will be…at AC, as Allendale Columbia hosts the VEX-IQ Northern New York State Championship on Sunday, March 4th, from 7:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

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Posted in: Centers for Impact, Fifth Grade, Highlights, Invent, Lower School, LS Birches, The Birches

AC Aces Robotics Team Featured as 13WHAM Bright Spot

Posted on January 24th, 2018 by Allendale Columbia School

13WHAM logo

Bright Spot: AC Aces

Channel 13 WHAM featured the AC Aces robotics team on their Bright Spot on January 23rd. The Aces placed second in the Excelsior District Finals, earned the Finalist Team Alliance Trophy, and was a finalist for the Promote Video Award.

(You can read more about the AC Aces in the blog post AC Aces Make Finals at Excelsior Championships by team member Matt Duver ’20.)

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Posted in: AC in the News, Centers for Impact, Eleventh Grade, Invent, Ninth Grade, Tenth Grade, The Birches, Twelfth Grade, Upper School, US Birches