Four Tips for Developing an App at 18

Posted on December 11th, 2018 by cnickels

When life gives you challenges, some people build an app! Noah Levine, a senior at Allendale Columbia School, knows that life on the autism spectrum can be overwhelming at times. He was born and diagnosed with autism and has worked hard at self regulation. He was inspired by the therapeutic content that he found helpful and started building an app that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to help kids on the spectrum self-regulate when they are overwhelmed. It also gives health providers valuable data about what content works for kids so they can adjust their care accordingly.

On National App Day, December 11th, we celebrate apps that people couldn’t imagine living their lives without. One day soon, Noah’s app will be one of those.

If you are thinking about creating an app, here are 4 things Noah recommends you consider:

  1. Have a clear idea.

    Noah saw the need for a tool that would help kids living with autism to self-regulate. He knew that therapeutic videos and content worked for him, but some kids can’t ever access this content in the first place, much less tell their doctors about what’s working. He knew he wanted to make it easier for more kids to access the therapeutic content and for doctors to see what’s been working for each person. When creating your own app, figure out a clear vision for what you want to accomplish before you get started building it.

  2. Network. Network. Network.

    Noah found helpful people through LinkedIn, family connections, and his Allendale Columbia community. His idea first got started with help from teachers during May Term, a three-week independent study opportunity for all AC Middle and Upper Schoolers. Telling people about his idea was the first step to making it a reality.

  3. Always ask questions.

    Like anything new, it’s natural to not have all the answers. “Don’t be afraid to ask questions,” said Noah. When developing his app, Noah reached out to experts from Duke and University of Rochester to help him resolve issues that came up.

  4. Make the most of your opportunities.

    What started during May Term has become an everyday project for Noah. Through the help of the AC Center for Entrepreneurship, Noah was able to continue working on his idea while getting critical feedback and mentorship from teachers on business, technology, and so much more.

Noah will graduate from Allendale Columbia in 2019. His app, called Horizon Autism, is still in development but he hopes to launch it soon. To connect with Noah (Network. Network. Network!) or to stay updated on his app, you can visit Noah on LinkedIn.

 

About the AC Center for Entrepreneurship
We believe our students must identify and solve problems creatively. The AC Center for Entrepreneurship will create opportunities for our students/participants to make an impact on the world by learning to adapt to a constantly evolving world, connecting globally, and carving their own path. Learn more about the AC Center for Entrepreneurship.

 

 

 

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Posted in: Eleventh Grade, Entrepreneurship, Highlights, Ninth Grade, Tenth Grade, Twelfth Grade, Upper School

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