The Importance of Connections at AC

Posted on October 12th, 2018 by Allendale Columbia School
“Our children are so happy this year.”

That’s what Lisa Shearer, mother of two students who transferred to Allendale Columbia School this year, said at a recent PACK meeting. “The very purposeful building of community and connections amongst students, staff, and faculty has made a world of difference for my children. They were instantaneously embraced by the entire community in such a meaningful way!”

12th grade students participate in a class activity to build connections.

9th and 12th grade students participate in a class activity to build connections.

At Allendale Columbia, “the importance of connections” is listed first of our four core values. While everyone works throughout the year to help students build connections with each other and the adults supporting them, we especially focus on connection at the beginning of the school year, when new and returning students arrive and are welcomed into the AC school family.

According to the longest longitudinal study on happiness out of Harvard University, “Personal connection creates mental and emotional stimulation, which are automatic mood boosters, while isolation is a mood buster,” says Dr. Robert Waldinger. In our role as an educational institution, it is vital that we teach and model for our community not just the importance of connecting, but also the skills needed to foster connections in any context. (See an article about the Harvard study and Dr. Waldinger’s TED Talk.)

It starts from the beginning of the admissions process, where every inquiry is followed up with a personal phone call, not just an email message. New students and their families are invited to on-campus orientation sessions before school starts, whether they are brand new to the school or just transitioning from Lower School to Middle School, or Middle School to Upper School. Each spring, students get a taste of what’s ahead for the following year when they are matched up with buddies in the next grade and invited to walk through a school day together. They can experience what the coming year would be like and have a personal guide they can turn to for questions.

“We think it’s important to build connections with the students and also with the parents,” Head of Lower School Michelle Feiss remarked. “We hold Hopes and Dreams conferences before the first day of school, where families meet individually with teachers to better understand the child and how best to support him or her. These meetings set the tone for the year and help to create a bond between parents and teachers.”

Photo: Ninth graders helped fourth and fifth graders in making one large balloon hat

Ninth graders helped fourth and fifth graders in making one large balloon hat

During the first week of school, a number of activities establish a foundation of connections for the year. Middle School and Upper School take the first Friday of the school year to bond as a class and focus on community building and fostering interaction between faculty and students outside school. These events address skills and themes which help instill core values, and they help build the community and connections students will rely on for this year and years to come. You can read about Middle School’s Advisory Day and Upper School’s Class Day to see how they explored this year’s themes. Students leave these events with friendships, teamwork experience, and mutual respect.

“For my son, the senior overnight trip at the beginning of the year was important,” noted Mrs. Shearer. “When he returned, he told us that he felt close with the entire class and had tons of friends. He also really appreciates the way the teachers engage with him and treat him like an adult.”

Every day at AC is an opportunity to build and strengthen connections. Students are welcomed with smiles at the car or bus door by staff and parent Helping Hands (equipped with umbrellas when needed). They offer a lift out of the car and handheld walk to the door for the youngest students, or assistance gathering backpacks and other daily paraphernalia for the older students. A welcoming “have a good day” to child and parent, often with a cheerful compliment or joke, starts the entire family off on a positive note.

“In the Middle School, mornings do not start with announcements or shuffling students off to class,” says Tina Duver, Head of Middle School. “Mornings begin together, as a group, recognizing each other for strengths, accomplishments, and contributions to the community. Attendance can wait for just a minute because here at AC, building those connections of community and thankfulness are important to building peer-to-peer and faculty-to-student relationships. The mindset starts early and continues throughout the day with positivity and reflection of self-worth within the community.”

Student in Advisory groups often build connections and empathy through activities that build awareness of self and others.

Advisory groups of students and faculty meet weekly to check in on student well-being, address concerns, and build support networks through team-building and conversation. Advisory groups are intentionally small (usually just six students), allowing advisors and students to focus on what students need that day, or that moment. Some days the focus is on mindfulness, and other days the focus is on upcoming academic projects or social and emotional needs. And sometimes it’s working together on a community service project, getting students to go beyond themselves and connect with the larger community.

“My daughter’s entire experience has been seamless, and she has felt very supported and has lots of friends,” continued Mrs. Shearer. “The study skills, time management, and work organization class, along with her Advisory group, have helped the school year to be stress-free.”

Even lunch promotes connection and inclusion. With family-style lunches, faculty members each host a table of students from across grades within their division. The students are assigned tables every month in Lower School, and every two weeks in Middle and Upper School, providing opportunities to get to know virtually everyone in the division. Students rotate through responsibilities for bringing food to the table and clean-up, and faculty members keep table conversations inclusive and respectful. No one sits by themselves at AC lunches.

AC School Counselor Starmeshia Jones is available for students who may want a bit more support making connections while on campus. “At any given point in a school year, I am working in small group, whole group, or individual settings with students who have had difficulty connecting or maintaining fulfilling friendships. All too often I think that self-esteem, anxiety, or self-consciousness can contribute to actual or perceived social disconnect.” Working with students on activities designed to build self-esteem, exploring themes of friendship, and gradually pushing them out of their comfort zones in building relationships can be useful. She continues, “seeing students move from a place of anxiousness last year to connecting more with their peers this year has been wonderful. They look more comfortable, and I’ve gotten reports that they are happier and more engaged with the adults and other youth in their lives.”

Photo: Younger and older students are partnered to build connections at the annual Blue/White Day.

Younger and older students are partnered to build connections at the annual Blue/White Day.

Special events at AC go deeper than they might at other schools. Blue/White Day isn’t just a school spirit day. It’s about pairing younger students with older students who guide them, do activities together, and cheer each other on. It’s competition mixed with collaboration, where teams of students age 6 to 18 work together to transfer water to a bucket or to guide a ping pong ball to a distant bucket. Older students know they are setting an example, and the younger students leave with a “big kid” friend and another familiar face around campus.

Professional development activities for faculty, planned by teacher Tony Tepedino, provide guidance for teachers around team-building and making connections that help them collaborate with and support each other. “Meetings start with an introduction to our group norms as a way to create a safe space for the work that will occur. We then move on to an entry activity that encourages attendees to connect with each other as humans first, which hopefully allows for more authenticity and openness while we learn together. The idea is to create a shared environment where students and teachers are comfortable to be themselves and take risks.”

“I am passionate about my children and their happiness. I’ve definitely shed my fair share of thankful, happy tears this year,” concluded Mrs. Shearer. “Brian and I have been very impressed with so many things. As parents, it was immediately apparent to us that AC’s intentional focus on connection is groundbreaking and very different from other educational experiences we’ve had. I wish AC’s model could be replicated nationwide to combat bullying in schools and promote inclusion on all levels.”

 

What’s your favorite way that AC connects? Tell us!

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Posted in: Highlights, Lower School, Middle School, Upper School

Upper School Builds Connections as School Begins

Posted on September 21st, 2018 by Allendale Columbia School

Connections are vital. As we are reminded nearly every day in the media and educational literature, connections are especially important in a fast-paced and often impersonal society. At Allendale Columbia, the importance of connections is a core value. To emphasize and instill this value, AC’s Upper School used the first Friday of the school year, Class Day, to focus on building connections between students and between students and faculty.

Each class’s activities centered on a theme with the goals of bonding as a class, community building, and fostering interaction between faculty and students outside school, setting a tone of mutual respect and positive teamwork. These events addressed skills and themes which help instill our core values, and they help build the community and connections our students will rely on for this year, and years to come.

9th Grade: Community   |   10th Grade: Equality   |   11th Grade: Leadership   |   12th Grade: Legacy

9th Grade: Community

Ninth grade focused the whole day on making connections with each other, beginning with some team-building activities with seniors. They then boarded a bus and headed to RocVentures. The staff at RocVentures guided the students in some very fun and challenging games that required teamwork. They also spent some time on the high ropes course and the climbing walls, where they learned a bit of resilience, a healthy respect for gravity, and trust in their teachers, who belayed them, and RocVentures staff, who guided them in the ropes course. In the afternoon, students did an introspective activity, in which they were asked to think about how their learning could connect with their passions or interests, and they ended the day with a fun, collaborative activity with the 4th and 5th graders. This activity, directed by Randy Northrup, involved Lower and Upper School students working together to make balloon hats and connecting all of the hats together, so that the whole group was essentially wearing one very large, comical-looking balloon hat.

10th Grade: Equality

Tenth graders worked with David Sanchez from the Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence in an eye-opening workshop centered around conflict without contempt. After a cultural lunch with Indian food at AC’s International House, the afternoon revolved around a role play activity to make students aware of their various social identities. The day concluded with yoga to introduce an effective stress management solution.

11th Grade: Leadership

Herb Alexander from Roberts Wesleyan College conducted a workshop for the junior class on forward planning and self assessments. Hilary Bluestein-Lyons from STAGES and Noah Chrysler from RIT’s improv group then conducted a workshop on improvisational theater, which teaches participants how to listen and communicate effectively. The juniors then put on a show for the 2nd graders. They are poised to use the leadership skills they cultivated that day.

12th Grade: Legacy

A trip to Niagara Falls was riddled with activities focusing on legacy and team building. A scavenger hunt and a ride on the Maid of the Mist were two highlights. The class spent the night at AsburyCam p and Retreat Center on Silver Lake, continuing the conversations about the legacy they will leave at AC. As they sat around the campfire theat night and shared what they liked about each other highlighted the bonds they share. The morning ended with skits about their 20-year reunion.

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Posted in: Eleventh Grade, Highlights, Ninth Grade, Tenth Grade, Twelfth Grade, Upper School